Office of Research, UC Riverside
Ertem Tuncel
Professor & ECE Vice Chair
Electrical & Computer Eng
ertem@ucr.edu
(951) 827-7718


CIF: Small: Sensors That Make Sense: Peak-Power Energy and Delay Constrained Networks

AWARD NUMBER
006887-002
FUND NUMBER
21269
STATUS
Closed
AWARD TYPE
3-Grant
AWARD EXECUTION DATE
6/30/2014
BEGIN DATE
10/1/2014
END DATE
9/30/2017
AWARD AMOUNT
$280,717

Sponsor Information

SPONSOR AWARD NUMBER
CCF-1423570
SPONSOR
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
SPONSOR TYPE
Federal
FUNCTION
Organized Research
PROGRAM NAME

Proposal Information

PROPOSAL NUMBER
14070600
PROPOSAL TYPE
New
ACTIVITY TYPE
Basic Research

PI Information

PI
Tuncel, Ertem
PI TITLE
Other
PI DEPTARTMENT
Electrical & Computer Eng
PI COLLEGE/SCHOOL
Bourns College of Engineering
CO PIs

Project Information

ABSTRACT

Sensors are becoming omnipresent. A wide range of applications such as environmental monitoring, smart metering, and remote monitoring of roads are already making an extensive use of the sensor technology to measure and transmit a diverse set of physical signals over noisy wireless channels. Over the next decade, the number of machines and sensors connected to the Internet is expected to explode, creating the so called Internet of Things (IoT). It is foreseen that a significant portion of the quintillions of bytes of data that will be generated every day by IoT will be processed and transmitted using complexity, power, and energy constrained sensor nodes. For the sake of mathematical analysis, these practical constraints are usually relaxed or completely ignored, thereby simplifying the problem at hand, sometimes even to the extent that allows one to obtain closed-form solutions. The main goal of this research project is to question such simplifications commonly made among information/communication theory researchers, and to try to formulate more practically relevant problems which can still be analyzed rigorously.

The practical constraints above will be solidified as zero-delay, peak-power-limited, and energy-distortion frameworks and combinations thereof in a multi-user joint source-channel coding setting. Preliminary analyses demonstrate that the solutions to the communication problems in these frameworks are significantly different from their counterparts in the classical infinite-delay average power-distortion framework. More specifically, the best known coding schemes in the classical framework become either provably suboptimal or not applicable at all. This research project will strive for complete characterizations of fundamental limits of communication under the aforementioned practical constraints.
(Abstract from NSF)