Office of Research, UC Riverside
Matthew Mahutga
Associate Professor of Sociology
Sociology
mattm@ucr.edu
(951) 827-5852


Distributional Consequences of Economic Globalization

AWARD NUMBER
007533-002
FUND NUMBER
33156
STATUS
Closed
AWARD TYPE
3-Grant
AWARD EXECUTION DATE
6/18/2015
BEGIN DATE
8/1/2015
END DATE
7/31/2016
AWARD AMOUNT
$87,016

Sponsor Information

SPONSOR AWARD NUMBER
1528703
SPONSOR
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
SPONSOR TYPE
Federal
FUNCTION
Organized Research
PROGRAM NAME

Proposal Information

PROPOSAL NUMBER
15070770
PROPOSAL TYPE
New
ACTIVITY TYPE
Basic Research

PI Information

PI
Mahutga, Matthew C
PI TITLE
Other
PI DEPTARTMENT
Sociology
PI COLLEGE/SCHOOL
Coll of Hum, Arts & Social Sci
CO PIs

Project Information

ABSTRACT

SES-1528703
Matthew Mahutga
University of California-Riverside

The causes of rising income inequality in advanced capitalist countries are not well understood by social scientists despite more than two decades of dedicated research. This project synthesizes literatures on the two most common researched causes of the increase in inequality: globalization and institutions. It advances both of these literatures by providing an explanation for the paradoxical findings on the distributional effects of economic globalization. This explanation identifies specific mechanisms by which globalization and national institutions interact to produce distinct distributional outcomes across time and space.

This study subjects the arguments to empirical scrutiny, a multilevel analysis of the Luxembourg Income Study's (LIS) individual wage data will be conducted. The bulk of NSF funds will support the harmonization of country-specific occupational categories in order to measure skill and work-place authority more directly than is currently possible, because both of these factors are the key mechanisms by which production globalization should affect inequality. In addition to advancing basic research on the causes of rising income inequality among advanced industrial democracies, this project will provide evidence-based assessments of the future implications of production globalization for income inequality, and of policy options at both the macro and micro levels. In tandem, these can help to ameliorate the impact of production globalization on income inequality, low-skill labor, and labor more generally, in the coming decades.
(Abstract from NSF)