Office of Research, UC Riverside
Hideaki Tsutsui
Associate Professor
Mechanical Engineering
tsutsui@ucr.edu
(951) 827-2444


Label-free, chemiresistive, paper microfluidic nanobiosensor array for multiplexed detection

AWARD NUMBER
008305-003
FUND NUMBER
33361
STATUS
Active
AWARD TYPE
3-Grant
AWARD EXECUTION DATE
7/5/2017
BEGIN DATE
7/5/2017
END DATE
6/30/2019
AWARD AMOUNT
$7,000

Sponsor Information

SPONSOR AWARD NUMBER
1606181
SPONSOR
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
SPONSOR TYPE
Federal
FUNCTION
Organized Research
PROGRAM NAME

Proposal Information

PROPOSAL NUMBER
17121566
PROPOSAL TYPE
Supplement
ACTIVITY TYPE
Basic Research

PI Information

PI
Tsutsui, Hideaki
PI TITLE
Other
PI DEPTARTMENT
Mechanical Engineering
PI COLLEGE/SCHOOL
Bourns College of Engineering
CO PIs
Mulchandani, Ashok;

Project Information

ABSTRACT

PI: Tsutsui, Hideaki
Proposal No: 1606181

This project proposes to develop a paper-based molecular sensing platform. The primary advantages are its low cost and ease of use. The proposed work is expected to broadly expand the capability and applications of paper-based sensors for a variety of fields, such as medical, agricultural, and environmental testing and diagnosis.



Paper-based microfluidic devices have recently emerged as promising sensing platforms for serving the diagnostic needs in many sectors of society. Advantages of paper-based microfluidic sensors include fast detection, ease of fabrication and use, minimal instrument requirements, lightweight, portability, and low cost. However, its widespread use beyond research laboratories has been hampered because of a lack of highly sensitive detection methods that can be easily implemented on a paper substrate. The overall goal of this project is to develop a label-free, highly sensitive, chemiresistive nanosensor platform. This goal will be achieved through a series of research tasks: 1) development of an ultrasensitive carbon nanotube chemiresistive biosensor on paper; 2) development of an effective fluid handling technology; and 3) integration and demonstration of label-free, multiplexed detection of cardiac biomarkers as model antigens. Intellectual merits include a highly sensitive sensing element made of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes and technological innovations of microfluidic transport, which collectively enable the proposed nanosensor. Broader impact of the research program is expansion of the capability and applications of the paper-based microfluidic-facilitated biosensors. In particular, the proposed label-free chemiresistive biosensor array is expected to be highly sensitive, facile, and economical. It is also expected to be readily applicable to the multiplexed detection of analytes in a variety of complex fluid matrices such as food, water, plants, and body fluids. In conjunction with research activities, this project will develop and integrate several outreach and educational activities, including new curricula development on paper-based microfluidic biosensors, research training of both undergraduate and graduate students, particularly underrepresented minorities and women, and outreach efforts to engage K-12 teachers and students of the Inland Empire region of California.
(Abstract from NSF)